Kantar: Apple On Track For ‘Record Quarter’ As iPhone 6 Sales Bump Up Its Market Share Vs. Android


Ingrid Lunden, TechCrunch:

Apple has been seeing its smartphone market share erode over the last several years as its simple-and-small line up of iPhones competed against model after model of low-priced, big-screened, fancy-featured Android-based handsets. But it looks like its latest iPhone 6 models — with their larger faces, 4G compatibility and Apple Pay support — may be helping it turn the tide a bit.

Lunden uses the latest figures — the last three months ending on October 31 — from Kantar Worldpanel. The figures show nine countries and year-over-year changes in the three-month (August, September, October) smartphone operating system sales share. The nine countries are: Germany, Great Britain, France, Italy, Spain, U.S.A., China, Australia, and Japan, in no particular order. For instance in Great Britain, iOS gained 10.4% points from 29.1% in the Aug.-Sep.-Oct. period in 2013 to 39.5% in the same period in 2014. iOS showed gains in Australia too: 35.0% to 40.4% for a gain of 5.4% points.

Sounds good. But doesn’t the size of the market matter? For instance, a 1% point gain in China (about 1.4 billion in population) should be way more significant than a 1% point gain in Australia (about 24 million in population). So I did some math and added in the total population — for simplicity sake — for each country and then figured out how significant these percentage point changes reported by Kantar and TechCrunch really were. I understand that there are differences among the countries mentioned (wireless infrastructure: overall reach, LTE deployment, cost, monthly payments, discounts, etc., per capita income, smartphone penetration/saturation, smartphone replacement rate, and many other differences), but all I wanted to see was how the size of a country’s population impact these numbers that seem to point to Apple turning the tide. The results are quite interesting.

Android, in order of significance:

All nine countries combined the percentage points changes from 2013 to 2014 resulted in an addition of about 80 million Android users, primarily because of the relatively small 4.8% point change in China. Now let’s look at iOS, also in order of significance:

All nine countries put together iOS added over 4.3M users, despite the relatively large (-13.1% point Y/Y) percentage point decrease in Japan. The percentage point decrease in Japan is quite significant (-16.6 million users) because Japan’s population is the third largest (almost 130 million) in this group, after China and the U.S.

Limiting our discussion to just these nine countries that Kantar profiled, Android added significantly (almost 19x more significant using our really simplified model) more users than iOS. So did iPhone 6 sales bump up the share of iOS versus Android? In Great Britain, yes. In China? No, because while iOS added 0.2% points (+2.7 million) Android added 4.8% points (+65.7 million). China is where it matters and Apple didn’t bump up its market share there. Japan? No. And in the nine countries as a group? Nope.





PSY’s “Gangnam Style” Forces YouTube To Upgrade To 64-Bit


YouTube:

We never thought a video would be watched in numbers greater than a 32-bit integer (=2,147,483,647 views), but that was before we met PSY. “Gangnam Style” has been viewed so many times we had to upgrade to a 64-bit integer (9,223,372,036,854,775,808)!

Over two billion views. Wow.





iPhone: 2007 – 2014


I remember June 29, 2007 like it was yesterday. I called the Apple Store, asked the Apple Store employee whether the iPhone was in stock, and upon confirmation that there were iPhones in stock drove to Valley Fair. I waited for maybe ten minutes, charged an enormous amount of money to my credit card, and walked out with an iPhone. Up until that point the only portable gadget I have wanted as badly was a Sony Walkman.

Six months prior to that day I was in San Francisco, and watched Steve Jobs introduce to the iPhone. At the time smartphones were run by Windows Mobile 6.x or Palm OS. Windows Mobile 6.x was the desktop version of Windows shrunk to fit a tiny screen. There were nested menus! It didn’t take too long for me to ditch the Windows Mobile 6.x-based Motorola Q. The Palm Treo was better, but the iPhone was a revolution. Multitouch? On a phone? Just incredible.

Next came the iPhone 3G, which was really fast, though I didn’t care for the name. (3G? Are we later going to get 4G?) Then the even faster 3GS came out. Still didn’t like that name. The year after that Steve Jobs came up on stage and changed the smartphone game with the retina iPhone 4. The display was amazing; so was the industrial design. Yes, there was that antennagate thingamajig, but the iPhone 4 was beautiful. The iPhone, 3G, and 3GS had a 3.5-inch LCD with a 480×320 pixel format. The iPhone 4 quadrupled the number of pixels to 960×640 and increased the resolution to 326 ppi. The experience of looking at images and text on the iPhone 4 was like nothing else. The doubling of pixels on both the x and y axes also made it easy for developers to upgrade their non-retina apps. Then the 4S came out: faster, and with an improved camera. The iPhone 4 was already the most popular camera on Flickr, and Apple made the camera even better.

I loved that the iPhones were easy to use with one hand, not like the enormous Android smartphones. The Samsung Galaxy S2 had a 4.5-inch screen! Huge, and just too big for normal hands. But something happened in 2012, something kind of weird. Apple decided to elongate the display. The original iPhone, 3G, 3GS, 4, and 4S all had a 3.5-inch LCD with a 3:2 aspect ratio. But the new iPhone 5 had a 4-inch LCD with a 16:9 aspect ratio. The pixel format was an even weirder 1136×640. There was one thing Apple did right: the resolution stayed at 326 ppi, so the visual experience remained pretty much the same. I thought, “Why bother going to 16:9 if you can’t even watch 720p videos at 1280×720?” The whole point of a 16:9 aspect ratio was HD video. Now developers had to have three versions of their apps: 480×320, 960×640, and 1136×640.

The year after that the iPhone 5S came out. Just like in prior years the 5S was faster and had a better camera. But the iPhone 5C came out too. The 5C was a lower-cost iPhone 5 (not 5S) with a plastic shell. Mmm… okay. The display remained the same, which was a relief: 4 inches was large enough. I couldn’t believe the size of some Android smartphones; the Sony Xperia Z Ultra had a six point four inch display! That wasn’t a phone it was a tablet. I made fun of those who had these gigantic phones by putting my iPad to the side of my face and pretended I was talking to someone. Ridiculous.

Then the iPhone 6 happened, along with the stupid big iPhone 6 Plus. I wasn’t too happy with the black plastic bits that covered up the antennas in the iPhone 5 and the 5S. Nor was I happy with Apple moving the audio connection from the top to the bottom. There were other niggles, but overall it was a good design. (I consider the 4 and 4S to be the best designed iPhones.) Instead of black plastic pieces the iPhone 6 has toyish-looking antenna bands. I don’t think the designers even tried to hide them. And the cameras stick out. This wouldn’t be a problem if the cameras always stuck out, but the cameras were always nicely integrated into the flat backs of all prior iPhones. Despite the bulging cameras these new ones are even better than the ones before, especially the optically stabilized camera on the iPhone 6 Plus. Still, Apple didn’t need to make the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus so thin that the camera had to bulge out. But the biggest issue I have is with the display.

The iPhone 6 sports a 4.7-inch LCD with a pixel format of 1334×750. (What in the world is that?!? I would have gone with a 4.5-inch display and a 1280×720 pixel format. Nice and tidy, and it would have also resulted in a resolution of 326 ppi.) So Apple is at least keeping the same resolution, right? Not really. The 5.5-inch iPhone 6 Plus features a 1920×1080 pixel format. The resolution? 401 ppi. That sounds pretty good, but not when compared to the latest and greatest from the competition. The LG G3 has a 5.5-inch 2560×1440 LCD good for a resolution of 534 ppi, and the Samsung Galaxy Note 4 features a 5.7-inch 2560×1440 OLED display with a 515 ppi resolution. But it isn’t all about the pixel format and resolution. According to DisplayMate’s Dr. Raymond Soneira, the Samsung Galaxy Note 4 has the best mobile display. The Galaxy Note 4 had the best color accuracy, and that to me is very important. I want to know that what I see on my screen is as close to the real thing as possible. I don’t think making the best display on a smartphone is Apple’s top priority anymore. How can Apple? The company had to split its focus and resources into developing — not just one as it has been doing since 2007 — but two displays.

Let me just briefly touch on how complicated it is for developers to develop apps for iPhones now. Developers need five versions (four if iOS 8.0 is required): 480×320, 960×640, 1136×640, 1334×750, and 2208×1242. Yes, you read that right: 2208×1242, not 1920×1080. Developers need to render pixels at 2208×1242 and then they are downsampled to 1920×1080. I’m not a developer (yet), but that sounds quite a bit more complicated than it should. Read the easy-to-understand explanation by PaintCode. I think simplicity is on its way out Apple’s window.

Apple had a great run with its iPhones, but 2014 was the first year since 2007 when the original iPhone came out that I didn’t upgrade to the latest and greatest iPhone. I think I found a better smartphone: the Samsung Galaxy Note 4.





IBM: 2014 Cyber Monday Mobile Sales


Emil Protalinski, VentureBeat:

As always in the U.S., iOS beat out Android in mobile shopping this holiday season. iOS users averaged $114.79 per order compared to $96.84 for Android users, a difference of 18.5 percent.

iOS traffic accounted for 28.7 percent of total online traffic, more than double that of Android, which drove 12.2 percent of all online traffic. More importantly, iOS sales accounted for 17.4 percent of total online sales, more than four times that of Android, which drove 4.4 percent of all online sales.

I’m going to come at this from a different angle. Most of us are not made of money, but most of us spend more than we should. And most of us have large debts: credit cards and mortgages to name the two largest.

Based on the above findings by IBM, users with iPhones and iPads spend more time shopping and spend more money buying things during Cyber Monday. If your goal is to spend less time on your smartphone and spend less money on your smartphone, a simple trick might be to trade in your iPhone for an Android smartphone.

PS: I’ve used both and if I were to guess as to one of many reasons why iOS users tend to shop and buy more is because there are more shopping apps that are better — as in easier on the eyes and easier to shop and buy — on iOS than on Android.





OS X 10.10 Yosemite: Absolutely Frustrating


I haven’t posted anything for a while because I have been having problems with OS X 10.10 Yosemite on my 2009 MacBook Pro. I should have waited before upgrading to Yosemite. Online forums are filled with frustrated users who upgraded to Yosemite on their older Macs.

My MacBook Pro is sufficiently equipped to run Yosemite: 2.8GHz Core 2 Duo CPU, 8GB RAM, 50GB SSD & 1TB HDD. I haven’t been able to figure out what exactly is the cause, but when I have any programs running, say Safari, after some time — it could be minutes or hours, you never know — the thing would freeze. If it was sleeping it doesn’t come out of sleep. If it was not sleeping it doesn’t respond to any input. The only thing it responds to is a long press of the power button, a hard power down.

After powering down and powering up dozens of times a day I had had enough. All those Apple ads about snazzy looking Macs with happy people, and here I was, not so happy. Sure my MacBook Pro still looks pretty good, but what good is good looks when it keeps on freezing and you can’t do anything with it. I was getting frustrated. I was even angry at Tim Cook: Instead of keeping his eye on the ball — not that he is directly in charge of OS development — he’s been all over the news getting interviewed here and there talking up how hard Apple works to make hardware and software work seamlessly together blah blah blah. I wasn’t too happy with Jony Ive either, for the same reasons. I’ve been in a bad mood for several days.

So today I decided I’m going to either find a way to downgrade to Mavericks or get a new computer. And if I was forced to get a new computer it wasn’t going to be a Mac. After a few attempts, my Mac was not letting me downgrade, at least not on my primary boot drive. I’ll save you the geeky nitty gritty details. There was my 1TB storage drive though. After going through some long and detailed instructions, I managed to prep a 8GB USB drive into a OS X 10.9.5 Mavericks Install Disk. Now the 1TB hard drive is where the SuperDrive used to be, and it’s not the fastest connection. But I was so fed up with Yosemite, I decided I would much rather have slow-as-molasses and reliable than fast and totally unreliable. It took me the entire afternoon to backup all of my files from the 1TB internal hard drive to an external one; once all of my files were safely backed up I was ready to try to install OS X Mavericks unto my non-boot 1TB drive. I wasn’t sure it was going to work, but it did! Yes it is slow — really stinkin’ slow — but I am happy I can be doing stuff again on my MacBook Pro.

I don’t know how long it will take Apple to sort this Yosemite mess, but I will not be booting into it until there is widespread confirmation from 2009 Mac users that Yosemite’s freezing problems have been fixed. I’ve learned my lesson: Apple no longer seems to wait to get everything right before launching. And I better not see Tim Cook or Jony Ive getting another interview before Yosemite is fixed.





The Most Color Accurate Mobile Display


Dr. Raymond Soneira conducted a study to find the most color accurate mobile display. He tested the six best mobile displays from DisplayMate’s Display Technology Shoot-Out article series over the last year: Samsung Galaxy Note 4, Microsoft Surface Pro 3, Samsung Galaxy Tab S 10.5, Amazon Kindle Fire HDX 8.9, Apple iPhone 6 Plus, and Apple iPad Air 2. The results… were in that order, with the Samsung Galaxy Note 4 in Basic Screen Mode coming out on top.





WALTR: Natively Playback Any Video File On iPhone, iPad


I test drove WALTR, and it is awesome. I had an AVI movie file, and normally there is no easy way to play it on my iPad. Here’s the hard way:

Here’s the easy way:

To watch the video on my iPad all I need to launch is the built-in Videos app. WALTR can playback a lot of video formats: MP4, AVI, M4V, M4A, FLAC, WMA, etc. Get it.





AT&T Stops Using Undeletable Phone Tracking IDs; Verizon Continues


Julia Angwin, ProPublica:

AT&T says it has stopped its controversial practice of adding a hidden, undeletable tracking number to its mobile customers’ Internet activity.

Why would AT&T do this?

The tracking numbers can be used by sites to build a dossier about a person’s behavior on mobile devices – including which apps they use, what sites they visit and for how long.

Ah, to sell user data to advertisers.

Edmonds said AT&T may still launch a program to sell data collected by its tracking number, but that if and when it does, “customers will be able to opt out of the ad program and not have the numeric code inserted on their device.”

If AT&T is more interested in its customers than its advertisers — that’s a big if — wouldn’t it be better for AT&T to make the sale of your mobile activity data opt in, instead of opt out? And what about Verizon?

A Verizon spokeswoman says its tracking program is still continuing, but added “as with any program, we’re constantly evaluating.”

Verizon uses the tracking number to identify the users’ behavior and offer advertisers insights about users gleaned from that data. Verizon says the data it sells is not tied to a users’ identity.

Verizon does not seem to give a hoot about its customers. Something to think about: identifying a user with a single data point is difficult, but as you add more data points uncovering the identity of a user becomes easier. I’m relieved that I am not an AT&T or a Verizon customer.





Microsoft Office Free on Mobile Platforms


Microsoft Office is free on iOS and Android. At first I was excited, went to the app store, searched for Microsoft Office, and then almost downloaded the free apps. Almost. I realized I didn’t need Microsoft Office. I haven’t used Word, PowerPoint, and Excel in years. And I hope I never have to.





Which Messaging Technologies Are Truly Safe And Secure?


Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF):

The scorecard includes more than three dozen tools, including chat clients, text messaging apps, email applications, and technologies for voice and video calls. EFF examined them on seven factors, like whether the message is encrypted both in-transit and at the provider level, and if the code is audited and open to independent review. Six of these tools scored all seven stars, including ChatSecure, CryptoCat, Signal/Redphone, Silent Phone, Silent Text, and TextSecure. Apple’s iMessage and FaceTime products stood out as the best of the mass-market options, although neither currently provides complete protection against sophisticated, targeted forms of surveillance. Many options—including Google, Facebook, and Apple’s email products, Yahoo’s web and mobile chat, Secret, and WhatsApp—lack the end-to-end encryption that is necessary to protect against disclosure by the service provider. Several major messaging platforms, like QQ, Mxit, and the desktop version of Yahoo Messenger, have no encryption at all.

I’m going to try out some of these.





   



Shop at Amazon.com and support DISPLAYBLOG